Landlords
The good. The bad. The ugly.

Unfortunately, many students face the issue of dealing with difficult landlords when living in a rented house. Make sure you check out your university’s advice and recommendations when you start looking. This way, you’ll know that the landlords are accredited and you’ll be as protected as possible from devious, or even illegal, behaviour.

We aren’t lawyers but this here’s some advice about knowing your rights and how to deal with difficult landlords. If you’ve had your own experiences that you’d like to share, please get in touch.

by law, your landlord must ensure the following standards are met

Maintain provision of smoke and heat detectors along with a safe escape in case of a fire

Water supply and drainage cannot be unreasonably interrupted and must be kept clean and in good repair

Gas and electricity appliances and installations must be safe and checked every five years

 

Maintain provision of smoke and heat detectors along with a safe escape in case of a fire

Water supply and drainage cannot be unreasonably interrupted and must be kept clean and in good repair

Gas and electricity appliances and installations must be safe and checked every five years

 
“ As much as it's the landlord's responsibility to ensure these standards are met when you move into the property - and see to the repairs if necessary - it's your responsibility as a house to maintain them. ”

If your landlord isn’t meeting these standards you should firstly try and speak to them about it. If you’re thinking “we’ve already done this ten times!” and they haven’t done anything, you could contact the local authority. Follow this link and scroll down to “report it”. The local authority can organise an inspection and can take enforcement action if the property:

1. Poses a risk to your health and safety.

2. Is poorly managed.

3. Is unsuitable for the number of people who live there.

4. Should be licensed but is not.

Before deciding what to do, you should check what type of tenancy you have. Many students in private rented accommodation have assured short hold tenancies and as long as your landlord follows the proper legal process, you can be evicted quite easily. You need to consider that enforcing your rights may antagonise your landlord and could put you at risk of eviction.

In short, the beginning of some drama.

The best thing you can do is always back yourself. Have your tenancy agreements at hand, somewhere accessible, and always save and even print communication between yourselves and the landlord. If you have a phone call, follow it up with an email summarising what was discussed. Also, ensuring you and the house are looking after the property as best you can will help your case massively.

who to talk to if things get messy

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